Swansong

This was one of my last projects before leaving Rollins for sunny California. The story is about a Rollins alum who was a scientist that worked on Little Boy, the  U-235 bomb. This was a labor of love between the photographer and myself. The people featured in the profiles are often some of the most interesting and incredible people. Because the subject is on the controversial side, we wanted to be respectful of the subject matter, but also do something really cool with it. 

 

 Inspiration & research

Inspiration & research

We (the photographer Scott Cook) knew we wanted to do something with chalk. I read every article I could get my hands on and binge watched every episode of Manhattan for inspiration. The photographer took my ideas and had the college physicist cross examine the formulas, and re-write many of them. As much as I love science and math, it's not my profession–so a lot of work was put into getting them right.

Not to mention...

There isn't that much information out there about these bombs. 

Sometimes we do really cool things at work! 💡#graphic #design #creative #nuclear #physics #swansong #orlando #chalk #art

A video posted by Candice Sarah Stevens (@candice.sarah) on

 Initial chalk drawing 

Initial chalk drawing 

 Final image for magazine

Final image for magazine

All and all I am pretty happy with how the project turned out and I am super grateful to have worked with such an incredible team. The photographer is so talented and creative and I had a wonderful creative director, who trusted me enough to take something from start to finish and really see this project through.

Infographic X Radio

It was really fun getting to work on this cool little piece highlighting the history of WPRK. Growing up in central Florida, WPRK is the best radio station. Funny thing is, I never realized it was a Rollins College radio station so it was really awesome to help the station with their events and branding on occasion at work. 

This specific piece was created for the magazine and then later adapted for the website which you can view here.

 Web version of infographic

Web version of infographic

Clippings & Roots

To date, this has been one of the most rewarding projects to work on for me. Like many projects, this was on a very tight deadline, and I had all of these ideas, yet with such a narrow window, I simply had no time to test. To hell with it, onward! Luckily, despite my neck going out from hours of woodburning in the same crippling position, it all came together, and with little time to spare. This project began with the hardware store and sketch pencils. The next step was scouring the Rollins College campus for all sorts of fun flora,  bringing them back to arrange on a scaled piece of wood, and figuring out what would actually work. It's always fun to take your work outside of the computer and bring it back old-school. My route was risky but for this particular project it really made all of the difference. My favorite experience was definitely building out the cover. Building the "R" out of dirt, collected mosses, and sprouts was so much fun. Happily, it turned out rich, and lively.

 This was one of the very first test photos taken in the beginning stages. 

This was one of the very first test photos taken in the beginning stages. 

I had about two weeks total from beginning to end taking over this feature. 

I had a mix of mosses that I collected from around the campus, my house, and purchased from a local neighborhood nursery.  To keep it fresh, I designed it late the night before the photoshoot in my house,  sent sample photos to the creative director, then the morning of, scoured for newly sprouted ferns and mushrooms to finish the assembly minutes before the shoot. It had to be done quickly because within hours the collected plants and moss would start looking pretty sad.

The History of Sailor Tattoos

What is cooler than getting to collaborate with a tattoo artist who specializes in old school tattoos? The history of sailor tattoos is absolutely fascinating and learning all of the meanings behind each one was so much fun for our team. For this feature, I collaborated with a tattoo artist, Ryan Went, to provide original variations of the tattoos that we were featuring. From those line drawings, I painted each with gouache and water color pencils, and then went over with ink and nupastels. From there I scanned each tattoo into illustrator and edited and refined for the editorial piece.